George Harrison's guitars: there's an app for that

For fans of the Beatles who feel like they've exhausted all possible avenues of information regarding their beloved Liverpudians, the multi-media capabilities of tablet computing devices may represent the final frontier, or at least a further one.

For fans of the Beatles who feel like they've exhausted all possible avenues of information regarding their beloved Liverpudians, the multi-media capabilities of tablet computing devices may represent the final frontier, or at least a further one.

"The Guitar Collection: George Harrison," an iPad app that allows users to explore some of Harrison's best-known and most well-loved gear, debuted today (2/23) through Apple's App Store.

The app, which costs $9.99, allows users to interact with Harrison's guitars by viewing them from a 360-degree angle, then accessing supplementary material about the history of each instrument, including archival sound files of Harrison himself discussing his guitars. Seven of Harrison's guitars are given the full museum-quality treatment in the app.

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Users can also see every song Harrison recorded with each featured instrument, and then hear the songs through the app -- the full song if the track is already contained in your iTunes library, a short sample if not.

"It's not like Spinal Tap," Harrison's son, Dhani, told the New York Times, referring to the scene in the 1983 spoof "rockumentary" when Nigel Tufnel shows off his collection of vintage guitars. " 'Don't point at it, don't even look at it.' They're not quite like that."

"Paintings should be in museums and should be able to be seen," he added. Instruments should have to be played every once in a while. Otherwise they'll perish."

The app was developed by Bandwidth Publishing and authorized by Harrison's estate. Dhani Harrison told the Times that more guitars will be added in future versions of the app.

 

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