IN THE NEWS:

Famed lyricist Hal David dead at 91

Legendary lyricist Hal David, known for penning songs such as "What's New, Pussycat?," "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" and "What Do You Get When You Fall in Love?," died Saturday (9/1) in Los Angeles.

Legendary lyricist Hal David, known for penning songs such as "What's New, Pussycat?," "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" and "What Do You Get When You Fall in Love?," died Saturday (9/1) in Los Angeles.

The 91-year-old Grammy winner suffered a stroke and died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, according to the New York Times.

David spent a large part of his musical career writing songs with composer Burt Bacharach, including about three dozen for Dionne Warwick. The two created "Don't Make Me Over," Warwick's first hit, as well as "I Say A Little Prayer," "Walk On By," "Message to Michael" and "I'll Never Fall in Love Again."

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Hal David

The illustrious pair also crafted songs for Dusty Springfield ("Wishin' and Hopin'"), Karen Carpenter ("Close to You") and Gene Pitney ("Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa").

David and Bacharach earned four Academy Award nominations for "What's New, Pussycat?," "Alfie," "The Look of Love" and "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head." The duo earned their only Oscar -- for the latter song -- in 1970.

In the late 1960s, the songwriters adapted Billy Wilder's film "The Apartment" into a Broadway musical entitled "Promises, Promises," which ran for three years and won a Grammy for best score from an original cast album.

David spent much of his time in his later years doing charitable and foundation work, including serving as the president of ASCAP, the songwriters and publishers' organization in the early 1980s. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1972, the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1984, and he received the fourth Gershwin Prize from the Library of Congress, along with Bacharach, earlier this year.

 

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